Social Studies Links

History General Sites

The Avalon Project at Yale Law School: Historical documents from ancient to the present.

Best History Sites: aims to provide quick, convenient, and reliable access to the best history-oriented resources online in a wide range of categories and has been designed to benefit history teachers and their students; however, general history enthusiasts will benefit from the site as well.

Crash Course: Check out the playlists for past courses in physics, philosophy, games, economics, U.S. government and politics, astronomy, anatomy & physiology, world history, biology, literature, ecology, chemistry, psychology, and U.S. history.

Digital History:  The materials on this Web site include a U.S. history textbook; over 400 annotated documents from the Gilder Lehrman Collection, supplemented by primary sources on slavery, Mexican American, Asian American, and Native American history, and U.S. political, social, and legal history; succinct essays on the history of film, ethnicity, private life, and technology; multmedia exhibitions; and reference resources that include a database of annotated links, classroom handouts, chronologies, glossaries, an audio archive including speeches and book talks by historians, and a visual archive with hundreds of historical maps and images.

DocsTeach at the National Archives: Thousands of primary source documents to bring the past to life as classroom teaching tools from the billions preserved at the National Archives. Use the search field to find written documents, images, maps, charts, graphs, audio and video in an ever-expanding collection that spans the course of American history.

EuroDocs: Online sources for European History. Search or browse by country or time period.

History Matters: Designed for high school and college teachers and students, History Matters serves as a gateway to web resources and offers other useful materials for teaching U.S. history.

History Animated: Animated maps of the American Civil War, the American Revolutionary War, World War II, Europe and The War in the Pacific.

History World: Histories, Timelines and more.

Library of Congress Digital Collections: Huge database covering many topics.

Library of Congress American Memory Project: Primary documents from American history. A little hard to search, but a great place for primary sources including photographs, letters, telegraphs and more.

Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources:  The Teaching with Primary Sources Program works with colleges and other educational organizations to deliver professional development programs that help teachers use the Library of Congress’s rich reservoir of digitized primary source materials to design challenging, high-quality instruction.

Making of America: Making of America (MoA) is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology. The collection currently contains approximately 10,000 books and 50,000 journal articles with 19th century imprints.

National Archives: The National Archives preserves and provides access to the records of the Federal Government including the Constitution, the Declaration of Independence, and the Bill of Rights; as well as slave ship manifests and the Emancipation Proclamation; captured German records and the Japanese surrender documents from World War II; journals of polar expeditions and photographs of Dust Bowl farmers; Indian treaties making transitory promises; and a richly bound document bearing the bold signature “Bonaparte”—the Louisiana Purchase Treaty that doubled the territory of the young republic.

Using Primary Sources on the Web: from RUSA (Reference & User Services of ALA), this site describes, offers links to, discusses how to evaluate and shows how to cite Primary Sources.

Zoom InZoom In is a free, Web-based platform that helps students build literacy and historical thinking skills through “deep dives” into primary and secondary sources. Zoom In’s online learning environment features 18 content-rich U.S. history units that supplement your regular instruction and help you use technology to support students’ mastery of both content and skills required by the new, higher standards: reading documents closely and critically, identifying author’s point of view and purpose, engaging in higher-order, text-based discussions, and writing explanatory and argumentative essays grounded in evidence.

Teaching about History

Crash Course: Check out the playlists for past courses in physics, philosophy, games, economics, U.S. government and politics, astronomy, anatomy & physiology, world history, biology, literature, ecology, chemistry, psychology, and U.S. history.

DocsTeach at the National Archives: Thousands of primary source documents to bring the past to life as classroom teaching tools from the billions preserved at the National Archives. Use the search field to find written documents, images, maps, charts, graphs, audio and video in an ever-expanding collection that spans the course of American history.

Library of Congress Teaching with Primary Sources:  The Teaching with Primary Sources Program works with colleges and other educational organizations to deliver professional development programs that help teachers use the Library of Congress’s rich reservoir of digitized primary source materials to design challenging, high-quality instruction.

Mr. Betts Class You Tube Channel: Very goofy teacher sings about history. Good content. Kids love him.

PBS Social Studies Resources:

Smithsonian Source: This website reflects the work of several groups of teachers who conducted research at the Smithsonian and other national historical organizations. For this reason, some of the primary sources included in Smithsonian Source are not from the Smithsonian collections. Teachers also chose the historical topics on the site, and these categories reflect their curricula rather than the terminology or organizational methods of the Smithsonian Institution.

Stanford History Education Group: A consortium of Stanford faculty, graduate students, post-docs and visiting scholars, SHEG is an award-winning R & D group that provides outreach to educators in California and across the nation. SHEG draws on over twenty years of research-based experience working at the elementary, middle, and high school levels to find the most effective ways to convey knowledge and love of history to students and teachers of all ages.

Teaching American History: TeachingAmericanHistory.org is a project of the Ashbrook Center at Ashland University. TAH.org sponsors a variety of resources, courses, and programs to help classroom teachers improve their knowledge of American history, government, civics, and ideas through the use of primary documents. TAH.org and Ashbrook programs and courses are unique in that they are all rooted in primary documents only, and are created and conducted by university scholars who are experts in their respective fields. Our faculty are full-time instructors at Ashland University and from universities and colleges across the country.

Teaching History with Technology: a resource created to help K-12 history and social studies teachers incorporate technology effectively into their courses. Find resources for history and social studies lesson plans, activities, projects, games, and quizzes that use technology. Explore inquiry-based lessons, activities, and projects. Learn about web technologies such as blogs, podcasts, wikis, social networks, Google Docs, ebooks, online maps, virtual field trips, screencasts, online posters, and more. Explore innovative ways of integrating these tools into the curriculum, watch instructional video tutorials, and learn how others are using technology in the classroom!

Timeline: Create beautiful timelines.

Zoom InZoom In is a free, Web-based platform that helps students build literacy and historical thinking skills through “deep dives” into primary and secondary sources. Zoom In’s online learning environment features 18 content-rich U.S. history units that supplement your regular instruction and help you use technology to support students’ mastery of both content and skills required by the new, higher standards: reading documents closely and critically, identifying author’s point of view and purpose, engaging in higher-order, text-based discussions, and writing explanatory and argumentative essays grounded in evidence.

Ancient Civilizations

PBS The Greeks: This website provides lesson plans based on the PBS program “The Greeks: Crucible of Civilization.”
The British Museum Ancient Greece: The British hosts a comprehensive exhibit on Ancient Greece.
Ancient Civilizations Online: Online version of a textbook.
Ancient History Encyclopedia: Covers many ancient history topics.
National Geographic Ancient World News: Highlights current new concerning discoveries about the ancient world. Connect current events with ancient history.

Innovators and Inventions

Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention & Innovation: From the Smithsonian, good resources on innovators and inventers.

National Inventors Hall of Fame: Search or browse by inventor, invention or date.

Politics

Political Cartoon Index

Political Cartoons:

U.S. History

US WWI Centennial Commission: The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission was created by an Act of Congress in 2013. The Commission’s mission is to plan, develop, and execute programs, projects and activities to commemorate the Centennial of World War I (WWI).

World History

US WWI Centennial Commission: The U.S. World War I Centennial Commission was created by an Act of Congress in 2013. The Commission’s mission is to plan, develop, and execute programs, projects and activities to commemorate the Centennial of World War I (WWI).